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Home / International / Met faces new questions over ‘trafficked’ teen in Epstein case

Met faces new questions over ‘trafficked’ teen in Epstein case

The Victims’ Commissioner is demanding that the Metropolitan Police explain its decision not to pursue a full investigation into claims a teenager was trafficked to the UK to have sex with Prince Andrew.

The Observer understands that Dame Vera Baird QC, a former solicitor general and chair of the Board of the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners, has taken a close interest in the allegations, first examined by Scotland Yard in 2015.

Baird, who has focused on protecting victims of sexual and domestic abuse throughout her career, is currently observing election purdah and cannot speak to the media.

However, prior to the election, she made her views known to a victims’ rights campaigner, telling him that she would be requesting a meeting with the Met once purdah was over.

Before the election was called I spoke at length with the Victims’ Commissioner and we both find it extraordinary that this matter was not proceeded with, Harry Fletcher said.

The Met has said that its investigators reviewed all available evidence after receiving a complaint relating to claims that were made in court documents.

It was alleged that in 2001 a 17-year-old, now known to be Virginia Roberts, was forced to have sex with Prince Andrew, purportedly at the London home of socialite Ghislaine Maxwell, the one-time girlfriend of the late disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein.

Related: Prince Andrew accuser says she was forced to perform sex acts at 17

His victims are now bringing claims for damages against his estate.

It is understood that lawyers for Roberts also independently contacted the force in 2016. But the Met chose not to pursue a full investigation.

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